200,000,000 Silent Voices

We live in a culture which clamors for political correctness. Our society demands equal access to everything from golf courses to father-daughter dances. But a society so consumed with a woman's right to pills and procedures has failed to protect a females most precious right: birth!

Chances are you've heard mumblings about infant girls killed in other countries and cultures which favor sons. Perhaps you have only heard mumblings because 200 million voices are silent, 200 million pens cannot write, 200 million faces remain unseen; all because 200 million girls are missing in the world today. Based on these massive numbers, this issue, these girls, deserve more than our mumblings or passing comments; they deserves our full voice! A new documentary is amplifying this voice through media and personal testimonies Its a Girl, explains why these are The Three Deadliest Words in the World.

The trailer alone speaks boldly. Early in the clip, one man shares sobering statistics: Today,India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born in America every year. Abandoned, aborted, smothered, strangled killed: as the film reveals, this is the plight for many girls in these countries. Sadly, the future isn't much brighter for those who survive infancy:

One in three girls in the developing world, as young as 7 to 10 years old, face being forced into marriage every day. These child brides are two times as likely to be beaten by their husbands, are often treated as property, and rarely see the opportunity to get an education.

While shocking in their nature, these hardships are not a surprising consequence of a culture which discounts women in the womb. If we want to increase a woman's access to education or eradicate domestic violence, we have to first promote her dignity in the womb! As Melissa Ohden, an abortion survivor, explains, defending women begins with defending life:

If its acceptable to end the life of a child simply because she is a female, how then do we stop the floodgates of abuse, violence, sex trafficking and the like? How do we draw the line in the sand to protect and respect women at one point in their lives when we fail to protect and respect women at their most vulnerable point: developing in the womb?

This documentary reminds us all that gendercide doesn't just destroy baby girls overseas; it damages the dignity of women everywhere.

Read the rest at Family Research Council