Louie Giglio and the New State Church

gigliomainPresident Obama kicked up some controversy by announcing that evangelical pastor Louie Giglio would be praying at the inauguration. Sexual liberationist groups quickly identified Giglio, as they did Rick Warren under similar circumstances in 2009, as "anti-gay." After a couple of days of firestorm from the Left, Giglio announced that he would withdraw.

Here's why this matters. The statement Giglio made that was so controversial is essentially a near-direct quotation from the Christian Scriptures. Unrepentant homosexuals, Giglio said (as with unrepentant sinners of all kinds) "will not inherit the kingdom of God." That's 1 Corinthians 6:9–10. Giglio said, "It's not easy to change, but it is possible to change." The Bible says God "commands all people everywhere to repent" (Acts 17:30), the same gospel, Giglio says, "that I say to you and that you would say to me."

The Christian faith in every expression has held for 2000 years that sexual immorality is sinful. This same Christian faith has maintained, again in every branch, that sexual expression outside of conjugal marriage is sin. And the Christian faith has maintained universally that all persons are sinners and that no sinner can enter the kingdom without repentance. This is hardly new.

[Read the rest of the article at Desiring God.]