Science of Uncertainty

"Science Is Not About Certainty" a noted theoretical physicist writes. For many people that might be a startling claim. Dr. Carlo Rovelli — one of the originators of "loop quantum gravity theory" — recently published an article discussing the nature of science. The piece, called "Science Is Not About Certainty," makes some points that biblical creationists have been pointing out for a long time.

Physicist Rovelli is an evolutionist and does not in the piece explore his personal religious beliefs (though he does disparage religious claims regarding certainty and truth), but he makes some refreshingly honest points about science. For one thing, Rovelli makes clear that the essence of science is gathering data and interpreting that data in ways that are often insufficient, limited, and changeable:

We have observations, we have data, data require organizing into theories. So then we have theories. These theories are suggested or produced from the data somehow, then checked in terms of the data. Then time passes, we have more data, theories evolve, we throw away a theory, and we find another theory that’s better, a better understanding of the data, and so on and so forth.

The data scientists observe must be interpreted, and Rovelli makes clear that a scientist's philosophy will affect the interpretation. "Since theories change, the empirical content is the solid part of what science is," he says. After bombastic statements by so many evolutionists—such as Bill Nye in the Nye-Ham Debate or representatives of the National Center for Science Education, who declare that students should never be taught that "theories" like molecules-to-man evolution and the big bang are at all controversial — the admission that scientific interpretations of data are fallible, changeable, and influenced by philosophical understanding is refreshing.

[Read the rest of the article at Answers in Genesis.]