Six Lessons in Good Listening

Listening is one of the easiest things you'll ever do, and one of the hardest. In a sense, listening is easy -- or hearing is easy. It doesn't demand the initiative and energy required in speaking. That's why "faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ" (Romans 10:17). The point is that hearing is easy, and faith is not an expression of our activity, but our receiving the activity of another. It is "hearing with faith" (Galatians 3:2, 5) that accents the achievements of Christ and thus is the channel of grace that starts and sustains the Christian life.

But despite this ease -- or perhaps precisely because of it -- we often fight against it. In our sin, we’d rather trust in ourselves than another, amass our own righteousness than receive another's, speak our thoughts rather than listen to someone else. True, sustained, active listening is a great act of faith, and a great means of grace, both for ourselves and for others in the fellowship.

Lessons in Good Listening

The charter text for Christian listening might be James 1:19: "Let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger." It's simple enough in principle, and nearly impossible to live. Too often we are slow to hear, quick to speak, and quick to anger. So learning to listen well won’t happen overnight. It requires discipline, effort, and intentionality. You get better with time, they say. Becoming a better listener hangs not on one big resolve to do better in a single conversation, but on developing a pattern of little resolves to focus in on particular people in specific moments.

[Read the rest of the article at Desiring God.]