Why Is the World Broken?

It is hard to deny that the world we live in is broken. Terribly broken. We are constantly bombarded with news of senseless shootings and terrorist attacks. Wars continue without end. Natural disasters such as tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods claim many lives each year. Despite our wonderful modern medical technology, thousands and thousands of people die every year of cancer, stroke, diabetes, or some severe infection. Beyond this, we see greed, poverty, abuse, jealously, racism, and seemingly every possible manifestation of man's inhumanity to his fellow man. It’s an ugly picture. This world is broken and can’t seem to find its way.

So where is the all-knowing, loving Creator God in the midst of all this pain and suffering?

Denying God

Many people think death and suffering are reasons to deny the very existence of God. They contend that a good God would not, could not, allow all these horrible things to continue. If He exists, if He is indeed a good God, would He not want to stop all these things? Therefore, they reason, God cannot exist. Sometimes they hedge their bets by adding that if He does exist, He cannot be a good God because He continually allows bad things to happen to good people.

Ultimately, though, this is faulty logic. Let's think it through.

How Did We Get Here?

If God does not exist, how do we explain the physical world around us? If there is no God who created the universe, then where did everything come from? The world's simple answer is that everything came from nothing. Matter just popped into existence from nowhere. Then over billions of years molecules randomly collided, resulting in the formation of planets and stars and galaxies.

From this lifeless matter sprang life. The first simple cell just assembled itself. Then through random mutation and natural selection (survival of the fittest), life forms became more and more complex until ultimately man came into being. This is called evolution.

No God. Nothing but chemicals banging together over millions of years.

The Basis of Morality

In a universe that is merely the result of random chemical reactions over millions of years, there would be no "god" to whom we are accountable. But in such a universe, a universe without an ultimate moral authority, how are right and wrong, good and bad, determined? In the final analysis, how are moral judgments made? Who decides? The answer is, everybody decides for himself or herself what is right and wrong.

[You can finish reading the rest of this article at Answers in Genesis. Click here.]